Treatment of coccyx pain

First of all, see a doctor. Unfortunately, many general practitioners do not take this coccyx pain seriously - here is what you can do about that. If possible, see a specialist with experience in this area. This is to check that your pain is not a symptom of cancer or some other disease (unlikely, but needs checking), and to start the ball rolling in case you need treatment. Coccyx pain often goes away within a few months after it starts - see First aid on how to help it disappear. If the pain persists, it is important to establish whether the coccyx is really the source of the problem - see What is coccydynia? and Investigations.

If the coccyx is identified the source of the pain, a number of people have reported good results from manual treatments of the coccyx, when applied by experts in this technique. Orthopedic specialists, on the other hand, will normally give an injection of an anti-inflammatory drug around the coccyx as the initial treatment. If such methods are not successful, the coccyx may be removed if the patient is regarded as a good candidate for surgery. Before going for this option, make sure that you are a good candidate, and that your surgeon has plenty of experience and success with this operation.

Controlling the pain by methods which don't affect the underlying condition has good and bad sides. The obvious good point about pain control is that it stops the suffering and depression that pain causes, and allows you to carry on a more normal life. The other good point about pain control is that it can prevent the changes in processing of pain messages in the central nervous system that chronic pain can cause. Unrelieved pain can put the system out of balance and lead to more widespread pain that is difficult to treat.

But controlling pain has its drawbacks as well. If your pain is caused by an unstable coccyx, for instance, and you can't feel the pain of that any more, then you may well cause further damage to it without realising. You therefore need to be careful not to make your condition worse. Another problem with pain control is that some methods, such as drugs, have side-effects which may be unpleasant themselves, or even have long-term consequences if continued for a long time.

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